• In 2006 Prof. Margaret Vandiver, Retired Professor of Criminology at the University of Memphis, published a book based on her major  research on lynchings in West Tennessee entitled Lethal Punishment.
  • Bryan Stevenson, founder of the Equal Justice Initiative, spoke in Memphis on Nov. 2, 2015 and challenged over 700 Memphians to memorialize the victims of the thirty-plus lynchings in Shelby County.
  • On Dec. 10, 2015, 150 people attended an Interfaith Prayer Service held in downtown Memphis in which all the names of known victims of Shelby County lynchings were read as part of the service.
  • A Research Committee began work in early 2016 with Prof. Tom Carlson as Convener and Prof. Margaret Vandiver a member.
  • The creation of a public, interactive website on lynchings in Shelby County began under the direction of Anthony Siracusa, Laryn Kragt-Bakker, Prof. Margaret Vandiver, and Prof. Tom Carlson. The Benjamin Hooks Institute for Social Change at the University of Memphis agreed to be a permanent home for this website.
  • Martha Park wrote and the Memphis Flyer published (2/4/16 issue) a major article on the Ell Persons Lynching of 1917.
  • An estimated 120 people attended a public Interfaith Prayer Service on May 22, 2016 near the Ell Persons lynching site on the 99th Anniversary of the lynching.
  • In February 2017 the LSP hosted a visit of 100 pastors, members of the Memphis Christian Pastors Network), to the site of the lynching of Ell Persons.
  • In February 2017 the LSP hosted the visit of British photojournalist Oliver Clasper to Memphis and the South to document lynching sites and record testimonies of people living near the sites. His work, The Spaces We Inherit, appears in the online version of the New York Times in March 2018.
  • In March 2017 about 20 LSP members attended an evening led by local high school students organized by Facing History and Ourselves which engaged about 200 students and adults in small group conversations led by students on the topic of lynchings and issues of race.
  • The LSP collaborated with Central High School in organizing a school-wide assembly with Rev. Dr. Andre Johnson as speaker on the story of the Memphis lynching of Ell Persons.
  • In March 2017 the 125th anniversary of the Peoples Grocery Lynching was commemorated with a prayer service and soil collection at the site of the lynching of Thomas Moss, William Stewart and Calvin McDowell.
  • Over 500 people attended the Centennial Prayer Service in May 2017 to commemorate the lynching of Ell Persons; about half black and half white, representing Muslim, Jewish, Christian and other faiths with over 35 Memphis-area congregations represented.
  • The Pink Palace Museum created an exhibit to coincide with the Ell Persons centennial.
  • In November 2017 The short film “An Accidental Drowning,” the story of the 1939 lynching of Jesse Lee Bond, was produced by Tom Carlson and Matteo Servente and was awarded first place in the MLK50 category at the Memphis Independent Film Festival.
  • In January 2018 John Ashworth became the LSP’s first Executive Director.
  • The Lynching Sites Project in keeping with its commitment to interfaith partnerships had a booth at the MusliMemFest in 2017 and 2018.
  • In April 2018 a prayer service was held in the main square in Arlington, Tennessee to commemorate the 79th anniversary of the lynching of Jesse Lee Bond.
  • In April 2018 ten members of the Lynching Sites Project traveled to Montgomery, Alabama to attend the grand opening of the Memorial for Peace and Justice at the Equal Justice Institute honoring over 4,000 known lynching victims in the United States from the end of the Civil War to 1950.
  • On May 20, 2018 members of the Lynching Sites Project held an interfaith prayer service to commemorate the 101st anniversary of Ell Persons at the site where he was lynched in 1917.